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This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.
FAQ 2017-11-05T20:36:07+00:00
WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN COLLABORATIVE LAW AND MEDIATION? 2015-07-23T01:54:27+00:00

Mediation is a dispute resolution process in which a neutral third party assists the participants in reaching an agreement. The mediator may be an attorney or other professional trained in conflict resolution. The mediator provides legal information but cannot give legal advice and cannot complete the case in court once an agreement is reached.

Collaborative Law is a process for handling a divorce and other family issues in which a separate attorney trained in family law and conflict resolution techniques represents each spouse. The lawyer provides legal advice, assistance in framing issues and facilitates negotiation. When a settlement is reached, the attorneys for both spouses cooperate in preparing and filing the necessary legal documents to conclude the action in court. Mental health professionals (acting as collaborative practice also called divorce) coaches or child specialists work as part of a team which also includes a financial specialist. These professionals use their individual expertise to provide guidance concerning emotional and financial issues related to the divorce and assistance in communication.

HOW DOES A COACH DIFFER FROM A THERAPIST? 2017-11-05T20:36:11+00:00

Collaborative Practice Coaches are licensed mental health professionals such as a psychologist or a social worker retained specifically to enhance the client’s listening and communication skills during the collaborative process. A Collaborative Practice Coach works confidentially under rules established in the retention agreement that the coach will never be required to testify in court should the case not be settled through the collaborative process. A client’s coach works in tandem with the client’s attorney and, with the client’s permission, may confer with the client’s therapist.

WHY SHOULD I INCLUDE A COACH ON MY TEAM? 2017-11-05T20:36:11+00:00

The collaborative approach uses face to face meetings with spouses and attorneys present to organize and share information and to negotiate various issues. Long-established patterns of ineffective spousal communication coupled with the stress and emotionality (anger, grief, worry) common at a time of a divorce can impede productive problem-solving and a rational approach to the many practical and legal divorce issues. The coach assists the client in identifying important underlying needs, improving communication skills, learning how to handle difficult conversations and verbalize concerns. The coach also can provide guidance and resources in how to reduce the situational stress and anxiety typically accompanying a major life change such as a divorce. In some cases a coach may act as a facilitator during the negotiations.

WHY SHOULD I INCLUDE A CHILD SPECIALIST? 2015-07-23T01:51:43+00:00

Legal disputes involving children particularly divorces impact these children not only during childhood but for their adult lives as well. The law requires parents to develop a specific structure generally referred to as a Parenting Plan which contains a schedule for the parents to be with the children and procedures making decisions about the children’s education, health and welfare. Often parents differ as to what each believes would be the best arrangement for the children. Resolving these differences during a highly charged emotional time can be especially difficult. Typically children experience fear and worry and grief about the how the divorce will change their lives. A child specialist can provide the parents with insights into the psychological developmental needs of children at differing ages. The child specialist can meet with the parents as well as the children if needed. The child specialist can be an informed neutral, non-judgmental voice in the process.

WHY SHOULD I INCLUDE A FINANCIAL SPECIALIST? 2017-11-05T20:36:11+00:00

A neutral financial specialist serves many purposes in the collaborative process. The financial neutral works individually with each spouse to analyze current and develop future budgets, create long term projections of income needs and identify tax issues of concern. The neutral professional can assist the clients with various alternatives to divide their assets most efficiently to meet their respective needs.

ISN’T THE TEAM APPROACH MORE EXPENSIVE? 2015-07-23T01:50:20+00:00

Although the team approach requires hiring additional professionals, it is cost-effective in that each team member has unique skills and can work effectively in his or her area of expertise. These related professionals generally charge lower fees than attorneys. The financial specialist reduces the hours the attorney must spend on the routine financial data gathering, organizing and analyzing information. By enhancing the parties’ communication, coaches make meetings more productive in reaching a settlement and thus reduce the overall cost. Working out shared parenting can be one of the most difficult aspects of a divorce. The child specialist has expertise that facilitates decisions concerning the children.

HOW QUICK IS THE COLLABORATIVE APPROACH? 2017-11-05T20:36:11+00:00

The spouses determine the schedule for the collaborative process. How long a particular case takes depends on the complexity of the issues and how available the spouses are to gather the required factual information and attend negotiating sessions. It can be considerably quicker than the traditional litigated divorce or it can go more slowly if the situation demands it. For example, sometimes parents wish to try a particular time-sharing arrangement for the children before adopting it permanently. This can be accomplished while the process is proceeding.

CAN THE COLLABORATIVE APPROACH WORK WHEN EMOTIONS ARE INTENSE AND EVEN HOSTILE? 2017-11-05T20:36:11+00:00

Working collaboratively is not easy but it can ameliorate much of the strain and miscommunication attendant to a divorce. The collaborative approach creates a respectful environment utilizing professionals trained to address emotions thoughtfully in a manner that does not add fuel to the fire. This approach encourages clients to seek non-adversarial solutions and to identify their interests. The directness of the meetings and the fact that a client’s questions and concerns are voiced often reduces the overt conflict.

WHAT OTHER BENEFITS CAN I EXPECT FROM THE COLLABORATIVE APPROACH? 2017-11-05T20:36:11+00:00

The collaborative process is private; the court file will consist only of required documents and thus a minimal amount of your personal information will have to be made public. An agreement crafted through compromise, open negotiation and consideration of each spouse’s interests may result in less post-divorce conflict and gives each spouse a full understanding of what is being agreed to and why they have made the decisions.